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Top 5 Creative Ways to End a Lesson

Tracy Lee Thomas

As teachers, most of us are very familiar with the topic of icebreakers and openers, but many of us sometimes ignore a very important aspect of the class: the closing. The introduction is just as important as the closing, but unfortunately many teachers forget to focus on this aspect of the class. Since the class wrap up can essentially help the students review, retain, and even remember important points in the lesson, it would be very beneficial to focus more attention on concluding your lesson in an engaging and fun way.
Interaction between teacher and children, funny class in school
Here are just a few ideas to help you end your lessons in a more creative way:

1 Minute Speeches: For this activity choose a few students or if you are working with a smaller group, have everyone take turns giving a one minute speech to the class. The students can either stand up near their desk or go up to the front of the class in order to give their brief speech. Have each student talk about what was done during the lesson, their favorite part of the class or have them give a summary about a reading activity they worked on. The topic can be modified and you may even use this activity to have your students get to know each other better during first lesson.

Corrections and feedback:
During the last 10-15 minutes of the class it is a good idea to go over some of the mistakes or errors that came up during the lesson. Many teachers also take advantage of this time to go over some common pronunciation mistakes. Correcting your students’ mistakes during this final moment of class can be extremely beneficial and it is more likely that your students will remember your comments and suggestions, since it’s the last activity they will be focusing on.
Write it up! Have your students practice their writing skills by doing an e-mail writing activity at the end of the class. Have the class write a brief e-mail to a friend, boss, or co-worker describing (in detail) what was done during the lesson. When the students are finished have them turn in their papers and in the next class you may provide them with feedback or go over some common writing errors together as a class. This activity can also modified and you can switch things up every once in a while and have your students write about topics like current events, celebrities, recent vacations they have taken, or even something more specific to the lesson that you covered that day.

Correcting your students’ mistakes during this final moment of class can be extremely beneficial and it is more likely that your students will remember your comments and suggestions, since it’s the last activity they will be focusing on.

The cool down: since the beginning of each lesson is cleverly named a “warm up” it only makes sense that the closing activity is called a cool down. During this activity, cool your class down by talking about any confusing or difficult topics the students encountered that day. Use this time to answer questions or explain anything that your students may have had a hard time with; take advantage of these moments to make sure that everyone in the class leaves with more clarity and less confusion about the topics covered in your lesson.

The fly swatter game: This game is perfect for younger students who have a bit of excess energy to burn off at the end of the lesson. Have your students make two lines at the front of the class, each of them with a fly swatter, newspaper, or a rolled up piece of paper on hand. Write two adjectives on the board and then ask “this adjective is used to describe people and not things” then have two students run up to the board and hit the correct word with their “fly swatter”, the first one to hit the right word wins a point for their team. This game can be modified to fit the level and topic of the class. Believe it or not, this activity can also be very fun for adults!

These are just some examples to help you conclude your lessons in a more engaging and fun manner. Try them out and see how your class responds to each one, in time your students may even request that you end the class with their favorite closing activity.

Can you think of any other fun ways to end a class? Let us know in the comments section below!

About the author

Tracy is a South African expat currently travelling around South America, spending a few months living and teaching English in areas that catch her attention. She is passionate about nature, music, design and social studies.