7 Unmissable Argentine Films & How They Can Help You Learn Spanish

Argentine Spanish is unique in its grammar, accent and its large amount of slang known as lunfardo. One excellent way to get used to this different variety of Spanish, which the locals call castellano, is dive in to Argentina’s film culture. Take a look at our pick of top films from the dynamic country:

El Secreto De Sus Ojos (2009)

Probably the most famous Argentine film, El Secreto De Sus Ojos is an Oscar-winning movie telling the story of a murder that took place in the 70s, and how it still haunts those affected by it 25 years later. This film is packed full of Argentine slang and is a good one to watch more than once, as you'll understand more and more about the story as you learn more about Argentine culture and history.

Nueve Reinas (2000)

A complex thriller that tracks the lives of two con men (Ricardo Darín and Gastón Pauls), Nueve Reinas is full of twists and turns and will keep you on the edge of your seat until the very end. It's also packed full of local slang relating to crime, money and sex, so put the subtitles on to pick up some new vocabulary.

El Hijo De La Novia (2001)

This comedy-drama centres around the mid-life crisis of a man who suffers a heart attack. After the attack he begins to re-evaluate his priorities in life, which often leads to hilarious consequences. A good one to learn vocabulary related to family life and relationships.

La Historia Oficial (1985)

La Historia Oficial was the first Argentine movie to win an Oscar back in 1985. Set after the Argentine dictatorship of 1976-1983, it explores the chilling after-effects of this period on one family. You'll be able to understand the emotions portrayed in this film, even if you don't catch every word.

Relatos Salvajes (2014)

Relatos Salvajes is a series of short stories put together to make a film. Similar to "New York, I Love You" in format, the stories are more on theme of "Buenos Aires, I Hate You". They explore how life in the metropolis of the Argentine capital can lead to extreme emotions and ridiculous behaviour, and provide great insight into the Argentines' famous pasión. This is a very visual movie, so even if you don't fully understand the nuances of the dialogue you can easily follow the plot.

Luna De Avellaneda (2004)

Set in the province of Buenos Aires, Luna De Avellaneda is about a man whose life centres around a sports and social club. However, as the members are dwindling and the club itself may be shut down, the characters need to fight to save it. This film is an interesting and realistic portrait of life in the provinces.

Wakolda (2013)

This box office hit is set in the south of Argentina in the 1960s, and tells the story of a young girl, Wakolda, and her family, who end up living with a Nazi war criminal without realising who he is. The dialogue is fairly sparse and the setting stunningly chilling.

Although these films are available with English subtitles, it’s always a far more enriching experience to watch a film in its original language. If your Spanish isn’t quite there yet, or you’re having trouble getting to grips with the Argentine dialect, Listen & Learn can help. Contact us to find out about our personalised instruction and group classes.